While the new Ziegler Cooper Downtown Houston office space may not stretch as high as St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York, 65 feet gives employees plenty of room to work.
While the new Ziegler Cooper Downtown Houston office space may not stretch as high as St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York, 65 feet gives employees plenty of room to work.

It is often said that unconventional thinkers - the dreamers, the creatives, the visionaries - have their heads in the clouds. A study published last year in The Journal of Psychology suggests that when it comes to freeing the mind and thinking creatively, having your head in the clouds (and in rooms with high ceilings) is best.

A University of Minnesota study from January 2011 determined that people working in rooms with 8-foot ceilings feel confined and are more detail-oriented, while those in 10-foot rooms think more freely, broadly and creatively.

What about a room with 65-foot ceilings? Would creativity increase exponentially?

'An inspirational space for both employees and clients'

This will soon become the reality for Ziegler Cooper Architects employees, who will be moving into their new Downtown Houston office space in the Bank of America Center in a few months. Construction of the 25,000 square foot space is not even expected to be complete until December of this year, but that hasn't stopped the firm from designing digital renderings of the Houston commercial space.

The stunning images are about what you would expect from an architectural firm.

"Direct escalator access will provide a dramatic entrance to Ziegler Cooper's third floor design studio," according to a company press release announcing the leasing of the space. "Designed to be an inspirational space for both employees and clients, the new office will feature 65-foot high cathedral ceilings over a highly open and collaborative studio space. This centralization of design studios places leadership in direct communication with professional staff."

Computer-generated images of the Downtown Houston office space, published by The Houston Chronicle, include five rows of desks with smaller partitions that do not obstruct communication or lines of vision. In the center of the room is a sitting area with comfortable chairs and an overhang with recessed light fixtures.

Few Houston office spaces are able to have the luxury of 65-foot ceilings. Still, those that are in creative industries should try to raise the roof of their spaces as best they can.

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