It’s all supply and demand (in NYC, at least)

As you probably know, the commercial real estate market in NYC is hot (and it’s really not great for tenants.) Demand is skyrocketing due to the burst of new businesses on the scene. The problem with this demand in NYC is that there’s no way for building owners to accommodate with supply. In most cities when demand is great, there’s room to build out and expand the city limits (i.e. urban sprawl.) Companies can move farther away from the city center for cheaper rent, which also drives prices down in the city because demand goes down. Makes sense. In NYC, the main problem is there’s no room to build out, and what space does exist is being quickly absorbed by new companies. For example, Chelsea only has 20 million square feet, with only 4.2% currently vacant (this was 6.6% last year, but 2.4% was already leased). In addition, only 168,000 square feet is scheduled to be added this year. The combination of low inventory being taken quickly, with no new space coming on the market means options are lacking and pricing is going to keep going up.

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As Houston retailers consider space lease options, some communities improving pedestrian access

When choosing a Houston retail space for lease, a company first needs to answer one question about itself - is it a destination location or will it require a high volume of foot traffic (and random walk-ins) to succeed? According to Yahoo contributor S.H. Wallick, the answer to this question will determine whether a business needs to position itself in a high visibility area.

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The Search For Commercial Space Is Coming Online

Well now it's official.  You've known it was coming for years, but you weren't sure who exactly would be looking and through what vehicles the search would be carried out in.  Commercial Real Estate is a funny business.  For an industry so lucrative with billions of dollars switching hands every year, it seems to be very slow to adapt to change and technology.  Most experts (real estate professionals who understand digital marketing and the technology behind online advertising) say that the residential side of real estate adopts changes in technology faster than the commercial side, and is about 3-8 years ahead of commercial when it comes to adopting technology and using it to increase productivity and source prospects.  

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NAR: Job growth leading to fewer vacancies

Real estate experts have long tied the industry's fortunes to the strength of the nation's job market, and now many say the right type of growth is occurring to positively effect several corners of the market - including commercial real estate.

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