5 Easy Ways to Manage Office Distractions

A common knock against open-office layouts is the noise factor. Sitting shoulder-to-shoulder with colleagues may open the lines of communication and foster collaboration but it can cost some employees their focus and sanity.

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Guest Post: How to navigate the #1 problem with finding a new office: “How much space is too much space?”

Let's face it, the commercial real estate industry is still stuck in its ways from decades ago. Archaic inventory systems and manual procurement of spaces should have been a thing of the past years ago. It's 2016 and fortunately for the industry, there's TheSquareFoot. We are a technology fuelled brokerage that is poised to make the leasing process smooth and painless.

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Weekly Best of Instagram: Office Space

This week we take you through some of the best spaces we have seen yet. From great colour mix to spacious functional interiors, these spaces have them all. Draw inspiration from some of these spaces to make your office one of a kind!

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Young companies: How to find an office that's right for you

Finding office space is one of the most important challenges any business faces. Not only will rent likely be your second largest expense (following payroll), but your office will also be your second home and becomes reflective of your company, team, and culture. Your office has a significant impact on hiring, retaining talent, and keeping employees engaged. For growing companies, price, location, size, and timing are all crucial to the search.

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It’s all supply and demand (in NYC, at least)

As you probably know, the commercial real estate market in NYC is hot (and it’s really not great for tenants.) Demand is skyrocketing due to the burst of new businesses on the scene. The problem with this demand in NYC is that there’s no way for building owners to accommodate with supply. In most cities when demand is great, there’s room to build out and expand the city limits (i.e. urban sprawl.) Companies can move farther away from the city center for cheaper rent, which also drives prices down in the city because demand goes down. Makes sense. In NYC, the main problem is there’s no room to build out, and what space does exist is being quickly absorbed by new companies. For example, Chelsea only has 20 million square feet, with only 4.2% currently vacant (this was 6.6% last year, but 2.4% was already leased). In addition, only 168,000 square feet is scheduled to be added this year. The combination of low inventory being taken quickly, with no new space coming on the market means options are lacking and pricing is going to keep going up.

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